Mary Anne Barkhouse: The Interlopers

Mary Anne Barkhouse: The Interlopers, installation view, MacLaren Art Centre, 2018. Photo: André Beneteau
Mary Anne Barkhouse: The Interlopers, installation view, MacLaren Art Centre, 2018. Photo: André Beneteau
Mary Anne Barkhouse: The Interlopers, installation view, MacLaren Art Centre, 2018. Photo: André Beneteau
July 5, 2018 - October 28, 2018

Mary Anne Barkhouse
The Interlopers
July 5 to October 28, 2018
Janice Laking Gallery and The Massie Family Sculpture Courtyard
Curator: Renée van der Avoird
Reception: Thursday, July 5, 7 to 9 pm

Artist talk by Mary Anne Barkhouse
September 27, 10:30 to 11:30 am
Campus Gallery, Georgian College
Admission free

The Interlopers, a solo exhibition by Minden-based artist Mary Anne Barkhouse, examines the connection between native North American animals and the colonial structures of territory, expansion and empire that encroach on their terrain. The hybrid animal, emerging from the crossbreeding of two similar but distinct species in a process catalyzed by human intervention, becomes a powerful metaphor for untangling notions of human-animal dynamics, Indigenous-settler histories, and questions of tolerance, respect and power.

Tempted by the spoils of a lavish dinner, a bronze coyote peers across a cherry wood banquet table towards a flock of crow-ravens. The birds are equally interested in the sundry remnants of the meal. The elegant Victorian table settings contrast with the more quotidian canned fish and take-out containers. Regardless, the animals look with keen and hungry eyes at the found feast that awaits. Photo-based works of wolves, wolf-dogs and coywolves adorn a royal-blue wall behind the table. Their ornate gold frames heighten the Baroque ambiance of the room.

Often considered intruders, these hybrid species are increasingly found in “human” environments, a forced coexistence that raises questions of place and belonging. The term interlopers refers not only to these roaming creatures, but also to the humans who encroach on their space and resources.

Mary Anne Barkhouse was born in Vancouver and belongs to the Nimpkish band, Kwakiutl First Nation. She has shown her work across Canada and in New York. Her public art installations can be found in parks and university campuses across Ontario and her work is in the collections of the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa; the Canada Council Art Bank, Ottawa; the McMichael Canadian Art Collection, Kleinburg; the Remai Modern, Saskatoon; the MacKenzie Art Gallery, Regina; the Art Gallery of Guelph; and others. 

 

Image: Mary Anne Barkhouse, Treats for Coyote, 2017, bronze, glass, crystal and porcelain figures, velvet, found table, dimensions variable. Installation view at Esker Foundation, Calgary. Photo: John Dean  

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